Company Counsel: How to Deal With Them

Executives who used the company's counsel as their own learned that could not work longer-term.

Have you used the company counsel as a personal legal advisor and perhaps as a personal confidante just to save a few dollars and feel silly for the experience? Sometimes that can cause a career to crash, so you can feel grateful for not encountering that, right?

Need legal advice about your personal interests? You are well advised to be concerned. Your professional and financial futures may be in jeopardy if you make unwise personal choices.  You need independent advice relating to business or a line between business and personal.  You need to choose one direction.  You need to find peace of mind.  You need to know the alternatives and the risks before you choose the answers.

You need an attorney to deal with a company attorney.

Employers are smart when it comes to negotiating compensation.  After all, isn't their primary business objective based upon increasing the "bottom line?"  Your employer probably has an attorney, possibly in the foreground, to be sure that the terms of your deal are negotiated in its favor.  You may even know the employer's attorney, and you may feel it would be difficult to negotiate on your own behalf.

You need an independent attorney for making transitions.

In today's business climate, executives are advancing their careers more rapidly and earning more than ever before.  They probably transition from one organization to another more than five times before they retire.  Each time they make a transition, their future earnings and reputation are at stake.